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TL;DR

In google chrome, simply:

  1. Press command + option + j on Mac (ctrl + alt + j on PC). This will open chrome dev tools
  2. In the window that just opened up, find the ‘Console’ tab and click on it
  3. Find the little flashing text cursor where you can type things. Hint: it’s to the immediate right of the > symbol
  4. Paste this code in and hit enter
videos = document.getElementsByTagName("video");
for(var i = 0; i < videos.length; i++){
videos[i].playbackRate = 2;
}

^^ this will change the speed to double speed, but you can edit the 2 on…


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Generative art — visually interesting phenomena produced with code — can take many forms. But few are as fascinating and insightful as Google’s DeepDream, which uses a neural network to reverse engineer images. This summarises discoveries made in a few hours’ playing around with the tool.

NOTE: images are high-res and any that appear blurry probably haven’t loaded yet — give them a minute!


There are numerous ways of getting your R Shiny app on to the web. Some are expensive, others are tedious, and most are finicky. Heroku is neither. Here’s a guide to deploying your R Shiny app to the web using Heroku.

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Heroku — what is it?

Heroku allows you to think far less about DevOps, letting you focus on building awesome apps.

With Heroku, you don’t have to manually provision infrastructure, relieving you of things like: starting EC2s from images, configuring security groups, setting port ranges, shelling in, installing dependencies, configuring a database, load balancing, scheduling, and any other configurations required to run your app…


“Gotchas” are realisations that don’t come naturally or intuitively, and which we often find very painful or time consuming to learn “the hard way”.

A classic “gotcha” in the world of R programming was (until R 4.0.0) accidentally treating strings as factors.

Here’s an example; a data.frame with a single value (5)…

df <- data.frame(col1 = "5")
df$col1[1] %>% as.integer
[1] 1

…but when we access that single value and convert it to an integer, we should expect to see 5? No, we see 1 is returned instead of 5. Huh?!

This happens because in certain cases, R defaults to…


Open powershell and run the following. Time: ~2 min (depending on download speed)

Steve Condylios

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